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Check out new fall public-access programs on MTSU’s ERC@MT

Check the schedule and mark your calendar now for the best in educational programming this fall on The Education Resource Channel @ Middle Tennessee, also known as ERC@MT!

Click on the Aug. 31-Sept. 6 mini-schedule above for a printable version.

Click on the Aug. 31-Sept. 6 mini-schedule above for a printable version.

Bookmark this page, www.mtsunews.com/erc-mt, and you’ll stay on top of all the MTSU education access channel’s new offerings, including programming for the week of Aug. 31-Sept. 6, shown at right.

The ERC@MT channel serves Rutherford and Cannon counties and portions of DeKalb, Smith and Wilson counties.

 It airs on Comcast Channel 9 in Rutherford County and DTC Communications’ Channel 195 in Cannon and DeKalb counties and some areas in Rutherford, Smith and Wilson counties. It also airs on AT&T U-verse Channel 99 across Middle Tennessee.

The Educational Resource Channel @ Middle Tennessee broadcasts educational programming suitable for all ages 24 hours a day, seven days a week, including:

  • nationally recognized documentaries and short films;
  • instructional K-12 series on varied topics;
  • the renowned “Classic Arts Showcase” and NASA Television;
  • MTSU’s monthly video magazine, “Out of the Blue”; and
  • special “MTSU Presents:” shows on unique university events and topics.

New programs for the week of Aug. 31-Sept. 6 and links for information include:

ERC@MT continues to expand its programming and has also rearranged its schedule appearance to better accommodate viewer needs by beginning each broadcast day at 6 a.m.

For more information about The Education Resource Channel @ Middle Tennessee, email Gail Fedak at gail.fedak@mtsu.edu.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Three inducted into Insurance Hall of Fame at MTSU

MTSU honored three insurance industry veterans recently with induction into the Robert E. Musto Tennessee Insurance Hall of Fame at Middle Tennessee State University.

The 2014 induction ceremony, held July 31 at Embassy Suites Hotel in Murfreesboro, honored the late Andrew Mizell Burton of Nashville, Tennessee, Joe Crosswhite of Greeneville, Tennessee, and John Sample of Knoxville, Tennessee.

Andrew Mizell Burton

Andrew Mizell Burton

Burton, a Sumner County native, began his insurance career in Nashville in 1901 when he became an agent with the Sun Life Insurance Company. Two years later, in 1903, he and five others organized the Life and Casualty Insurance Company of Tennessee. Burton became the company’s first president and served in that capacity until February 1950.

Burton was a large benefactor and supporter of David Lipscomb College, which later became Lipscomb University. He was named to the board of directors of the college in 1917 by founder David Lipscomb and served continuously in various capacities, finally as chairman emeritus for life. He died in 1966.

Burton’s namesake and grandson, A.M. Burton III, accepted the posthumous Hall of Fame plaque for the family.

Joe Crosswhite

Joe Crosswhite

Crosswhite recently retired from the Tennessee Farmers Mutual Life Insurance Company, which provides insurance for Tennessee Farm Bureau members. Throughout his 29-year tenure there, Crosswhite won almost every sales award his company had to offer, including being recognized as a Top 10 agent 26 times. He was named to the company’s All Star group, Round Table, Honor Council and Winners Circle, and he was a recipient of the coveted President’s Award.

In addition to supporting a variety of professional organizations in the industry throughout his career, Crosswhite also actively served in the community as a long-time member of the Gideons International, board member of Heritage Community Bank in Greeneville and president of the Greene County YMCA.

Sample continues a 65-year career in the insurance industry as general agent emeritus with the Mass Mutual Financial Group in Knoxville. He has qualified for the industry’s Million Dollar Round Table for more than 50 years and previously served as president of the Knoxville Association of Life Underwriters and Knoxville General Agency Management.

John Sample

John Sample

Sample has been actively involved in the Knoxville community for decades, serving as president of the Knoxville Civitan Club, on the Board of Governors for the University of Tennessee and on the boards of directors of multiple area banks.

The Robert E. Musto Tennessee Insurance Hall of Fame, created on the MTSU campus in 1999, honors entrepreneurs who created insurance companies and the agents and company employees who have made a difference in their companies and their communities, significantly affected the lives of many people and advanced the role of insurance in society.

The Hall of Fame is named for the late Robert E. Musto, longtime vice president of the National Life and Accident Insurance Company. The Robert E. Musto Insurance Hall of Fame, which is under the auspices of the Tommy T. Martin Chair of Insurance in MTSU’s Jones College of Business, is located on the west wall of the first-floor south lobby of the Business and Aerospace Building at MTSU.

Fifty-seven people have been inducted into the hall since its inception, according to Dr. Kenneth Hollman, holder of the Martin Chair of Insurance at MTSU.

For more information, visit http://mtweb.mtsu.edu/insurance/.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

Make your appointment now to ‘Bleed Blue’ for MTSU Sept. 8-10

MTSU and Western Kentucky University and their supporters have helped save thousands of lives since 2010 with a friendly “blood battle” competition, and the rivalry is back for 2014!

An MTSU student checks his “I donated!” badge while preparing to give blood at the 2013 “True Blue Blood Drive” in the Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center. The rivalry returns Sept. 8-10 in the “MTSU vs. WKU Blood Battle 2014.” (MTSU file photo)

MTSU students, staff members, alumni and community supporters can make an appointment today at www.redcrossblood.org to donate life-saving blood on campus Sept. 8-10 and once again help MTSU “Bleed Blue, Beat WKU.”

The annual blood-drive competition is resuming for a fourth year now that the Western Kentucky Hilltoppers are in Conference USA alongside the Blue Raiders. The teams meet on the gridiron at 6 p.m. Sept. 13 at MTSU’s Floyd Stadium, where the blood-drive winner will be announced at halftime.

Donors can make an appointment to give blood at MTSU’s Student Health, Wellness and Recreation Center on Blue Raider Drive between noon and 6 p.m. Monday, Sept. 8; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 9; or 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10.

Supporters should enter “MTSU” in the “Find a Blood Drive” box at the website to quickly schedule an appointment. All MTSU donors will have free reserved parking at the Rec Center and will receive a T-shirt while supplies last.

MTSU won the blood drive competition in 2010 and 2011, while WKU took the win in 2012 and MTSU conducted its own successful drive in 2013.

You can watch a video from MTSU’s successful 2013 “Bleed Blue” blood drive below.

“This is an incredible opportunity for both universities and their communities to give back at a time when there’s such a desperate need for blood,” said Diane Turnham, associate athletic director for MTSU and one of the blood-drive planning committee’s leaders.

“For the Blue Raiders this year, the drive is especially important, because we have been informed that this summer alone, the Red Cross is short 80,000 units of blood nationwide from previous summers. With road construction surrounding our own Murfreesboro Red Cross headquarters, donations have been down there as well. We need every staff member, student, alumnus and community member to come out to this most important drive.”

MTSU and WKU supporters have rolled up their sleeves and donated more than 3,800 units of lifesaving blood since 2010, when the universities started their “blood battle” to help their communities and build up blood supplies for the American Red Cross.

MTSU’s efforts have provided more than half that total — 2,276 units of blood — in the last four years.

Diane Turnham

Click on the graphic above to make an appointment to donate blood at MTSU Sept. 8-10.

Click on the graphic to make an appointment to donate blood at MTSU Sept. 8-10.

Because each unit of blood can save up to three lives, MTSU’s donors alone have affected more than 6,800 lives since 2010. The combined MTSU-WKU totals have helped as many as 11,500 people in the region.

“We have arranged free parking for donors, and you can make your appointment for any of the three days by going to www.redcrossblood.org and typing in ‘MTSU,’” Turnham added. “We’ll also need student and staff volunteers from our campus to help with the drive to make sure everyone kind enough to donate is able to get through in a timely manner.”

Turnham and fellow MTSU blood-drive organizers Dr. Gloria Bonner and Ray Wiley, along with the Red Cross’ Robert Wagner and Mike Cowles, appeared on WGNS Radio’s “Action Line” program Aug. 18 to discuss the community’s need for blood donors. You can listen to an archived copy of their appearance here.

Donors also can find some helpful tips to make their blood donations successful at http://ow.ly/AiN07.

Walk-in donors will still be welcome Sept. 8-10 but organizers are encouraging MTSU donors to make appointments now to get the most convenient times and speedier processing on donation day.

For directions to the Rec Center, visit www.mtsu.edu/camprec/directions.php. For updates and more information about the blood drive, bookmark this page and follow @MTSUNews on Twitter with the hashtag #BleedBlueMTSU.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

New, returning MTSU students ‘Meet Murfreesboro’

New and returning MTSU students, faculty and staff have one more opportunity to “Meet Murfreesboro.”

Day 2 of the annual New Student and Family Programs Week of Welcome event will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27, in the Student Union Commons.

Numerous Murfreesboro-area businesses, restaurants, ministries and others participate under two large tents.

For more information, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/nsfp/.

Nathan Tilton, center, an MTSU junior aerospace major from Brookhaven, Mississippi, hands his prize drawing registration form to Bed Bath & Beyond customer service manager Pauline Kongos as junior business administration major Keaton Davis, right, waits and freshman recording industry audio production major Patrick Austin, left, of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, completes his form. The exchange took place during "Meet Murfreesboro," an MTSU New Student and Family Programs Week of Welcome event Tuesday, Aug. 26, outside the Student Union. Meet Murfreesboro also will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27, at the same location. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

Nathan Tilton, center, an MTSU junior aerospace major from Brookhaven, Mississippi, hands his prize drawing registration form to Bed Bath & Beyond customer service manager Pauline Kongos as junior business administration major Keaton Davis, right, waits and freshman recording industry audio production major Patrick Austin, left, of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, completes his form. This took place during “Meet Murfreesboro,” an MTSU New Student and Family Programs Week of Welcome event Tuesday, Aug. 26, outside the Student Union. Meet Murfreesboro also will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27, at the same location. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

 

Colleen Whitaker, left, an MTSU senior accounting major from Nashville, listens as MTSU alumnus and former Blue Raider football player Delvin Pikes shares about the ministry opportunities at Bethel Community Church in Murfreesboro during Meet Murfreesboro Aug. 26.

Colleen Whitaker, left, an MTSU senior accounting major from Nashville, listens as MTSU alumnus and former Blue Raider football player Delvin Pikes shares about the ministry opportunities at Bethel Community Church in Murfreesboro during Meet Murfreesboro Aug. 26.

MTSU junior Sarah Larose, left, of Nashville, and senior Sherwine Lucien of Antioch, Tennessee, listen as Hot Spot Tanning's Lauren Guthrie discusses the business she manages in Murfreesboro. Participants have an opportunity to win prizes by spinning the wheel at this table and can register to win prizes at others.

MTSU junior Sarah Larose, left, of Nashville, and senior Sherwine Lucien of Antioch, Tennessee, listen as Hot Spot Tanning’s Lauren Guthrie discusses the business she manages in Murfreesboro during Meet Murfreesboro Aug. 26 in the Student Union Commons. Participants have an opportunity to win prizes by spinning the wheel at this table and can register to win prizes at others.

 

 

James Union Building reopened to public following repairs

The James Union Building has been reopened to the public. 

The building has been under repair since a July 19 flooding incident that damaged electrical equipment in the mechanical room of the building’s basement. Offices and staff that were temporarily relocated during repairs have returned to the building for normal operations. Minor work will continue until all repairs are complete.

The JUB, as it is popularly known, houses a wide variety of offices and facilities including the Scheduling Center, RaiderZone Restaurant, the Faculty Senate Office, Student ID Office, the Philosophy Department, the Women’s Studies Department, classrooms and academic offices.

The roughly 52,000-square-foot facility opened in 1952 as MTSU’s first student union and has remained in constant use since for campus and community special events as well as classes and other day-to-day operations. It was named for Clayton L. James, a longtime social science professor and MTSU’s first dean of students.


 

UPDATE: James Union Building open to staff as repair work continues

Aug. 11, 2014

Power has been restored to the MTSU James Union Building, meaning the building is now accessible for staff, facilities officials said.

The building remains closed to the general public while repairs continue following a July 19 flooding incident in the mechanical room of the building’s basement. Affected offices and classes have been relocated to other buildings.

The JUB now has cold water only, and air-conditioning has not yet been restored. While power was restored Monday, there will be intermittent power outages as electrical repairs proceed. The building is expected to reopen to the public before the start of the fall semester Aug. 25.

The James Union Building houses a wide variety of offices and facilities including the Scheduling Center, RaiderZone Restaurant, the Faculty Senate Office, Student ID Office, the Philosophy Department, the Women’s Studies Department, classrooms and academic offices.


 

UPDATE: MTSU James Union Building remains closed for repairs

July 29, 2014

The MTSU James Union Building will remain closed for at least the next week as repairs continue following a July 19 flooding incident in the mechanical room of the building’s basement.

The James Union Building remains closed for repairs following a July 19 flooding incident in the basement. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

The James Union Building remains closed for repairs following a July 19 flooding incident in the basement. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Maintenance personnel await delivery of new equipment to be installed and checked before power can be restored to the building. Offices and classes housed in the JUB have been relocated to other buildings while repairs are made. Power could be restored by Wednesday, Aug. 6, depending on parts delivery and installation.

Facilities personnel found the basement flooded when responding to a fire alarm on July 19. While heavy rainfall that day contributed to the flooding, it appears a malfunction to a hot water tank in the basement was a major contributor to the water damage, according to MTSU Facilities Services.


 

MTSU James Union Building closed for repairs

July 21, 2014

The James Union Building at MTSU is closed for repairs after a flash-flooding incident over the weekend damaged electrical equipment in the mechanical room of the building’s basement.

Facilities personnel found the basement flooded when responding to a fire alarm early Saturday. The flooding appears to have been caused by heavy rainfall and a damaged hot water tank in the basement.

The building will be closed at least through Sunday, July 27, and perhaps longer as facilities personnel get a full assessment of damages this week, officials said.

Clean-up and repairs are ongoing in the basement of the James Union Building, which will be closed all week after flash flooding damaged electrical equipment in the buildings mechanical room over the weekend. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Clean-up and repairs are ongoing in the basement of the James Union Building, which will be closed all week after flash flooding damaged electrical equipment in the buildings mechanical room over the weekend. (MTSU photo by News and Media Relations)

Classes held in the JUB have been moved temporarily to Peck Hall, as have some university staff and offices housed in the building.

Tuesday’s scheduled CUSTOMS check-in, usually held in the JUB, will now take place on the first floor of the Student Union. CUSTOMS is MTSU’s summer orientation program for new students, freshmen and transfers.

The Campus ID office has been temporarily relocated to the MTOneStop in the Student Services and Admissions Center. All ID cards can be created and printed there until the JUB reopens, according to the Information Technology Division.

Updates will follow as more information becomes available.

The James Union Building houses a wide variety of offices and facilities including the Scheduling Center, RaiderZone Restaurant, the Faculty Senate Office, Student ID Office, the Philosophy Department, the Women’s Studies Department, classrooms and academic offices.

The roughly 52,000-square-foot facility opened in 1952 as MTSU’s first student union and has remained in constant use since for campus and community special events as well as classes and other day-to-day operations. It was named for Clayton L. James, a longtime social science professor and MTSU’s first dean of students.

Gently used household goods needed for Aug. 23 ‘Great Giveaway’

When international students come to MTSU for the fall 2014 semester, they’ll be able to get what they need to make their homes more comfortable.

Raiders for Christ is accepting donations of gently used household items for its annual “Great Giveaway” from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Aug. 23, at the group’s headquarters, 1105 E. Bell Road in Murfreesboro.

Raiders for Christ logo web“Anything that would help an international student set up an apartment or a dorm room is welcome,” said Sarah Johnson, director of women’s outreach.

The most sought-after items include china, silverware, mattresses, sheets, comforters, sofas, chairs, toaster ovens, shower curtain liners and umbrellas.

“Bicycles go over really well, because most of the time they don’t have any way to get around,” Johnson said.

About 20 volunteers, including five truck drivers, will be on hand to help load and transport items to students’ residences. Each international student may take one large item and as many small items as he or she wants.

Johnson said Raiders for Christ, an MTSU student organization that describes itself as “a community of disciples on a journey with Jesus,” has conducted the “Great Giveaway” for some 15 years.

“We’ll have about 100 students come in during the day,” she said.

To donate items or for more information, contact Raiders for Christ at 615-896-1529 or send an email to Johnson at sarahfjohnson@yahoo.com.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

‘MTSU Magazine’ touts MTSU role in historic preservation nationwide

The summer 2014 edition of “MTSU Magazine” profiles MTSU professor and state historian Carroll Van West, who is well known in a field that’s as much about gaining trust as it is about preserving structures.

Since becoming director of the Center for Historic Preservation, established in 1984 by the Tennessee General Assembly as MTSU’s first Center of Excellence and one of nine original centers at Tennessee Board of Regents universities, West has established a reputation that’s helped make the center and MTSU historic preservation students familiar in places well beyond Tennessee’s borders.

Click on the image to view an electronic version of MTSU Magazine.

Click on the image to view an electronic version of MTSU Magazine.

MTSU has experienced remarkable success through the years placing graduates in jobs in the field of historic preservation, in places of employment such as state historic preservation offices, military bases, national parks, federal agencies, historic sites and museums, preservation or cultural resources management consulting firms and departments of transportation.

It’s all part of CHP’s mission, which is not only to help Tennessee communities identify and use their heritage assets (historical sites, artifacts and narratives that tell stories of the past) but also to support and direct student research and experiential learning opportunities. Through the years, the CHP has helped communities develop historic preservation plans, historic structure reports, heritage tourism plans, National Register nominations and more. Along the way, students studying Public History at MTSU have worked alongside West and his staff, putting “boots on the ground,” as West calls it, and getting real-world historic preservation experience.

“There is no better way to learn history and develop a passion for it than to go put your hands on it,” West says. “It’s a great competitive advantage because when our students go on interviews they talk about their projects, and employers know from the get-go that they have real experience.”

Other articles in the new edition of the magazine include:

  • A profile of alumnus Rickey Smith, who is working to build tomorrow’s Army;
  • A list of the top 10 Myths about the Modern MTSU (and why MTSU graduates should send their child or grandchild to MTSU);
  • A study of the revival of vinyl records from the perspective of three MTSU faculty experts;
  • A second look at golf coach Whit Turnbow’s new charity, which proves that one good deed leads to many others;
  • A conversation with Dr. Meredith Dye, who studies an oft-ignored female population living behind bars;
  • A glimpse of the past as one good deed from a former MTSU president continues to support MTSU’s mission;
  • A look at financial gifts to the University’s ongoing $80 million fundraising campaign that demonstrate the power of True Blue;
  • A compilation of recent news, awards, events and notable accomplishments at MTSU;
  • Spotlights on two honorary degrees recently awarded to two extraordinary individuals with MTSU ties.

Readers may also download “MTSU Magazine” free for their iPads and Android devices. The MTSU Mag app, available in the iTunes store and now at Google Play, includes special multimedia content built into every issue that’s not available in the print editions.

Printed copies of “MTSU Magazine” are distributed twice annually to more than 105,000 alumni readers. The publication also is distributed to interested community members, including state lawmakers and members of the Tennessee Board of Regents.

“MTSU Magazine” also is available online at www.mtsumagazine.com.

— Drew Ruble (drew.ruble@mtsu.edu)

MTSU plans to test campus tornado sirens Tuesday afternoon

MTSU plans to conduct a routine monthly test of its tornado sirens on campus this Tuesday, Aug. 12, at 12:20 p.m.

This is a brief, routine test of the system, and no safety actions will be required.

The university notifies the campus and surrounding neighborhoods before these tests each month. Tests are conducted on alternating Tuesdays and Wednesdays to minimize distractions for classes and neighbors.

Members of the campus community can prepare for emergency weather situations anytime by checking MTSU’s list of “safe places” at http://bit.ly/MTSUSafePlaces. You also can make note of the siren-testing schedule by visiting http://mtsunews.com/tornado-siren-testing. Bookmark both sites!

Remember that, in the event of a weather emergency, all students, faculty and staff automatically receive a Rave alert at their MTSU email addresses. If you’re not already receiving text and/or voice alerts too, visit http://mtsunews.com/weather and use the “click here and log in” link to make those notification changes.

Chinese professors absorb language, culture in MTSU program

Chinese professors are immersing themselves in American culture at MTSU in order to teach the English language more proficiently.

For the fourth year, the university’s Center for East and South Asian Studies is sponsoring the Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages program, also known as TESOL.

A total of 17 English instructors from three institutions have taken in everything from seminars on grammar and teaching methodology to American culture.

Participants in the Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages program pose with MTSU personnel in front of Miss Mary Bobo’s Boarding House and Restaurant in Lynchburg, Tennessee. Dr. David Schmidt, vice provost for international affairs, is standing third from left, next to the door, on the back row, while Yuiping Cui, associate director of MTSU’s Confucius Institute, kneels at far right in the front row. Mike Novak, Confucius Institute assistant director, stands at far right. (Photo submitted)

“Most of them have been teaching for many years in China,” said Dr. Guanping Zheng, director of the MTSU Center for East and South Asian Studies, “so this gives them an opportunity to see how we approach teaching foreign languages.”

The visitors’ itinerary has included participation in the Summer Language Institute, where Dr. Shelley Thomas of the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures teaches the Total Physical Response, or TPR, method.

TPR engages the learner in the process through storytelling and physical movement, enabling the rapid acquisition of vocabulary.

Zheng said that large class sizes prevent the Total Physical Response method from being copied for use in Chinese institutions, but the ideology still can be applied.

While visiting MTSU, the Chinese group also has ventured to several nearby locations for a taste of Southern hospitality, including the Stones River National Battlefield northwest of Murfreesboro, the Jack Daniels Distillery in Lynchburg, Tennessee, and a local church.

“I think it is a very good cooperation between China’s universities and MTSU,” said Lynn Zhang of Inner Mongolia University of Nationalities, one of the visitors. “I appreciate this program, and we learned a lot from our respective professors.”

One group of instructors will leave Aug. 1, but the rest will remain on campus until Oct. 1.

For more information about the program, contact Zheng at 615-494-8696 or guanping.zheng@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

MTSU’s Center for Popular Music acquires Spring Fed Records

The Center for Popular Music at Middle Tennessee State University has acquired the renowned Spring Fed Records from the Arts Center of Cannon County.

The Arts Center has donated the Grammy-winning label’s name and rights and sold its existing inventory to MTSU, said Dr. Greg Reish, the Center for Popular Music’s new director.

  Founded in 2002, Spring Fed Records is devoted to issuing unique and historically significant recordings of traditional Southern music, including old-time country, blues and gospel. Among its featured titles are music by Uncle Dave Macon, Sam and Kirk McGee, The Fairfield Four, Frazier Moss and Mississippi John Hurt.

Spring Fed’s compilation of field recordings by pioneering African-American folklorist John Work III won a Grammy in 2008 for its liner notes by former CPM staffer Bruce Nemerov.

The label established a strong partnership with MTSU and the Center for Popular Music from its inception with contributions from Nemerov, former CPM director Paul Wells and the late Dr. Charles Wolfe, a venerated scholar of traditional music.

Dr. Greg Reish

“Spring Fed’s regional emphasis on traditional music fits well with the CPM’s mission and will allow us to explore even further the vast repository of historically and culturally significant recordings in the CPM archive,” Reish said.

The Center for Popular Music is affiliated with MTSU’s College of Mass Communication and is housed in the Bragg Mass Communication Building on campus.

Production and marketing of new Spring Fed releases will also work in cooperation with the College of Mass Communication’s highly regarded Department of Recording Industry program, giving students the opportunity to work in a specialized sector of the business.

Beverly Keel, recording industry department chair, said the acquisition is “a wonderful opportunity both for the music of Spring Fed Records and for MTSU, which has one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious music business programs and the highly esteemed Center for Popular Music.

“Our students will get a chance to gain real-world experience by promoting this music and scholars everywhere will have the opportunity to study the history of Spring Fed at MTSU.”

Mass Comm logo croppedKen Paulson, dean of MTSU’s College of Mass Communication, added that the addition of “Spring Fed Records gives MTSU an extraordinary opportunity to use the recordings of the past to enhance the college’s future. The label adds a new dimension to our educational opportunities and underscores the pivotal role the Center for Popular Music plays in the College of Mass Communication.”

Spring Fed will be housed in the Center for Popular Music, and CPM staffer John Fabke will manage its day-to-day operations. A new marketing and sales structure, including a new website, will roll out soon.

The Spring Fed catalog is distributed by City Hall Records of San Rafael, California. Selected titles are also available as digital downloads from Amazon.com, iTunes and CD Baby.

The Center for Popular Music at MTSU is a research center devoted to the study and scholarship of popular music in America. Established in 1985 by the Tennessee Board of Regents as one of 16 Centers of Excellence across the TBR system, MTSU’s CPM maintains an archive of research materials stretching from the early 18th century to the present and develops and sponsors programs in American vernacular music.

For more information on the Center for Popular Music and its projects and special events, visit http://popmusic.mtsu.edu.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)