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MTSU students offer kids, elders some Good Friday ‘egg-citement’

Some MTSU students will try to make Good Friday an even better Friday for some local youngsters and their elders.

Stephanie Bush

The 26 students of Stephanie Bush’s Aging Health and Development Class will host an Easter egg hunt at 1:30 p.m. Friday, April 18, at Stones River Manor, a senior living community at 205 Haynes Drive in Murfreesboro.

Bush, an instructor in the Department of Human Sciences, said about 200 people attended last year’s event, and seeing the youngsters have so much fun delighted the manor’s residents.

“We’ll be hiding plastic eggs filled with candy on the grounds,” Bush said. “There will be games, refreshments, an inflatable bounce house and a visit from the Easter Bunny.”

A separate area will be set aside for babies and toddlers to hunt eggs with their parents, and activities will be planned for the residents.

The class is an experiential learning opportunity that helps students understand aging, families in later life and program planning and implementation for seniors.

For more information, contact Bush at 615-898-5604 or stephanie.bush@mtsu.edu.

Gina K. Logue (Gina.Logue@mtsu.edu)

‘MTSU On the Record’ takes you around the world in 36 credit hours

MTSU’s unique international affairs master’s degree is the subject of the next edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Moses Tesi

Dr. Moses Tesi

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Moses Tesi, a professor of political science, will air from 8 to 8:30 a.m. Sunday, April 20, on WMOT-FM (89.5 and www.wmot.org).

The Master of Arts in International Affairs degree offers concentrations in two areas: international security and peace studies and international development and globalization. It was approved by the Tennessee Board of Regents in 2011.

Candidates must complete at least 36 semester hours of graduate-level designated courses. The degree program provides students with the tools to evaluate national or international policies, an understanding of foreign cultures and the foundations for a professional international career and/or doctoral level study.

“For example, a student who works in international development could really do a practicum … at the World Bank, United Nations, the United States Agency for International Development, or, for that matter, nongovernmental organizations such as CARE, International Red Cross, Doctors Without Borders and so forth,” Tesi said. 

To listen to previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, go to the “Audio Clips” archives here and here.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

MTSU plant sale for agriculture scholarships underway now

Nancy Ricketts, left, assists MTSU adjunct speech faculty member Jeri Burnett with a selection of Wave petunias on the first day of the School of Agribusiness and Agriscience plant sale April 11 in the Horticulture Center. Also pictured is Dr. Cliff Ricketts, who oversees the sale to raise funds for student scholarships. The sale will run from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily for three weeks. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

It’s time for the annual School of Agribusiness and Agriscience plant sale at the Horticulture Center on Blue Raider Drive across from the Tennessee Livestock Center.

The sale began April 11 and will continue from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily for three weeks, said professor Cliff Ricketts, the organizer of the event that raises student scholarship funds.

The sale is open to the public and the campus community. Payment is cash and check only; no credit or debit cards will be accepted.

Izzy Fiore, 3, of Murfreesboro, looks at petunias available for shoppers at the annual School of Agribusiness and Agriscience plant sale in the Horticulture Center. She is the daughter of MTSU alumni Kelly and Brent Fiore.

A large selection of vegetables, hanging baskets and bedding plants will be available. The vegetable selections include tomatoes, peppers, okra, cucumbers, watermelon and cantaloupe.

Because of construction, Lightning Way is closed in front of the greenhouse and Horticulture Center.

A plant sale sign will direct people to a special parking area near the greenhouse, where they can enter through the back door. A printable campus map can be found at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap13-14.

Off-campus visitors should obtain a parking pass from Parking Services, which is located on the south side of campus just off East Main Street near the university’s main entrance with the monument.

Students in an upper-division agriculture class raised the plants, Ricketts said.

For more information, call 615-898-2523.

 

 

 

A large sign on the back of the greenhouse lets buyers know how to find the entrance to the annual School of Agribusiness and Agriscience plant sale. The sign is visible from MTSU Boulevard and the parking lot across from Jim Cummings Hall.

A large sign on the back of the greenhouse lets buyers know how to find the entrance to the annual School of Agribusiness and Agriscience plant sale. It is visible from MTSU Boulevard and the parking lot across from Jim Cummings Hall.

Aviation academy fuels MTSU, McGavock partnership (+VIDEO)

In four years’ time, MTSU and McGavock High School in Nashville have forged a budding relationship as partners in The Academies of Nashville program.

The Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools’ academies throughout Davidson County enable students to learn through the lens of a career or academic theme in a highly personalized learning community, the system’s website said. Through their respective academy, students are exposed to a multitude of careers and opportunities, industry skills and potential employers by way of classroom speakers, site visits, job shadowing and internships.

The MTSU-McGavock results include:

McGavock High School senior Zach Cotterman, left, utilizes a flashlight to inspect an internal part of the wing on a Cessna airplane donated by MTSU as class instructor Carlos Smith observes. MTSU has donated time and equipment in the partnership. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

McGavock High School senior Zach Cotterman, left, utilizes a flashlight to inspect an internal part of the wing on a Cessna airplane donated by MTSU as class instructor Carlos Smith observes. MTSU has donated time and equipment in the partnership. (MTSU photos by News and Media Relations)

•  Current McGavock senior Chris Hodnicak being accepted into the MTSU aerospace program, where he will focus on the administration side;

• McGavock faculty member Carlos Smith expanding his knowledge through the university’s graduate program;

• MTSU providing equipment, including an airplane, for the students to use in training; and

• MTSU professor Wendy Beckman offering a large amount of passion for the educational pursuits of young people. McGavock students, faculty and staff welcome her personable, hands-on, professional style.

“MTSU has donated a lot of time and materials,” said Paula Barkley, who serves as coach for the Academies of Nashville programs at McGavock. “We’ve had really great business partners and MTSU is one of them.”

For more on the aerospace program, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/aerospace/.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

Bound for MTSU as a freshman in August, McGavock High School senior Chris Hodnicak tries his hand at flying (and landing) a helicopter on a simulator in the school's aviation flight area. He plans to study aerospace administration.

Bound for MTSU as a freshman in August, McGavock High School senior Chris Hodnicak tries his hand at flying (and landing) a helicopter on a simulator in the school’s aviation flight area. He plans to study aerospace administration.

Students, parents invited to observe air traffic control simulator

All MTSU students are invited to attend an April 18 reception in the Department of Aerospace’s air traffic control lab to learn about air traffic control and lucrative career opportunities in that industry.Aerospace logo

Aerospace students will provide an air traffic control demonstration to visitors in the new $3.2 million ATC simulator, said Raymond E. Johnson, an ATC simulator training instructor.

Students and their parents can drop by from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. April 18 to observe the simulation in the lab located in the Room S-112A in the south portion of the Business and Aerospace Building. A printable campus map with parking instructions is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap13-14.

MTSU students and their parents can drop by from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. April 18 to observe a demonstration of the air traffic control simulator (shown above) located in the Room S-112A in the south portion of the Business and Aerospace Building. (MTSU photo)

MTSU students and their parents can drop by from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. April 18 to observe a demonstration of the air traffic control simulator (shown above) inside the Business and Aerospace Building. (MTSU photo)

All visitors will have the opportunity to observe the lab in use, ask questions and determine if they are interested in pursuing a career in the aerospace field, organizers said. A pizza lunch will also be served.

“We want any interested students to come watch our students demonstrate their skills, and see how exciting an air traffic control career can be,” Johnson said. “The labs are challenging and fun, but not easy. It takes a special skill-set to do this work, and our veteran controllers can make a good assessment of that potential.

“If you complete the coursework and are hired by the FAA, there is the potential to make $100,000 to $175,000 a year.”

Johnson asks that interested students RSVP by email to MaryLou.Cornett@mtsu.edu by April 16.

Will inclement weather affect MTSU’s schedule? Find out here!

If inclement weather forecasts have you wondering if MTSU classes and events will be delayed or cancelled, bookmark this page, mtsunews.com/weather, to keep track of the latest updates!

If inclement weather arises that will affect university operations, MTSU will always inform the campus and surrounding community via:
  • alerts from MTSU’s Rave Mobile Safety system;
  • local radio and television stations (see list below);
  • the “Alert Updates” web page at www.mtsu.edu/alertupdates;
  • a note on the MTSU home page at www.mtsu.edu;
  • the university’s Twitter feed, @mtsunewsand
  • the MTSU hotline (615-898-2000).

 

All current  MTSU students, faculty and staff automatically receive email alerts from Rave, including weather-related emergencies, delays and cancellations.
If you want to receive text and/or voice alerts too, click here and log in with your PipelineMT username and password to update your information.

(Rave Alert FAQs, including adding or changing contact information, are available here .)

If MTSU classes are cancelled or delayed, the announcement will apply to all classes, credit and noncredit. All university offices will be open unless the announcement specifically says they’ll be closed. Overnight decisions will be announced by 6 a.m. the following day.

Radio Stations
TV Stations

Students concerned about class attendance during inclement weather can refer to the university’s 2013-14 “Blue Raider Planner and Handbook ,” which explains that

… students will be allowed to use their own discretion when snow and icy conditions exist; they will be given the opportunity to make up missed classes should they decide not to attend. (page 22)

Project Help, MTSU’s early intervention preschool, also has updated its inclement-weather closing policy. You can read the policy here and also check Project Help’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ProjectHelp for its weather closing updates.

MTSU also tests its tornado sirens monthly to ensure proper operation during tornado warnings and other emergency alerts. A schedule of the monthly tests is available at mtsunews.com/tornado-siren-testing. That page also includes a link to locations of the safest places on campus.

The MTSU Alert4U emergency weather information page at http://mtsu.edu/alert4u/tornado.php also includes tips on preparing for tornado weather and a “Frequently Asked Questions” link to MTSU-specific information for tornado warnings.

Stones River Chamber Players close season at free April 7 concert

The Stones River Chamber Players, MTSU’s ensemble in residence, will close their 2013-14 season with a free public concert at 7:30 p.m. Monday, April 7, in Hinton Music Hall inside MTSU’s Wright Music Building.

The ensemble members, all of whom teach in MTSU’s School of Music, will perform two French works: Maurice Ravel’s song cycle “Don Quichotte a Dulcinée” for baritone and piano and Olivier Messiaen’s “The Quartet for the End of Time” for violin, clarinet, cello and piano.

Click on the graphic above to listen to streaming audio performances by the Stones River Chamber Players.

MTSU voice professor Stephen Smith will sing the Ravel piece with piano professor Lynn Rice-See on piano.

“These three (Ravel) songs were originally intended for a French film project based upon the story of Don Quixote, the main character in Cervantes’ novel, ‘El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha,’” Smith explained.

“They were originally written for a baritone voice, but Ravel himself agreed to have them published in a higher, more tenor-friendly key, and the higher settings are the ones I will be performing.”

The Messiaen quartet will be performed by MTSU faculty members Andrea Dawson on violin, Todd Waldecker on clarinet, Christine Kim on cello and Arunesh Nadgir on piano.

Dr. Michael Parkinson, director of the MTSU School of Music, said the “‘Quartet for the End of Time’ is internationally acknowledged as one of the major musical works of the past century.” Messiaen created the piece as a prisoner of war in Nazi Germany.

“This performance by the Chamber Players is my first opportunity to hear the work in person, something I have wanted to enjoy for a long time,” Parkinson said. “I hope that music lovers from throughout our metropolitan area will come together to hear this remarkable piece.”

ou can listen to streaming audio performances by the Stones River Chamber Players at www.mtsu.edu/music/srcpabout.php. For details on more MTSU School of Music performances, call 615-898-2493 or visit www.mtsumusic.com and click on the “Concert Calendar” link.

Little ones of Project Help raise autism awareness with friends (+VIDEO)

The children, staff and volunteers of MTSU’s Project Help worked this week to make the community more aware of autism with a special, and colorful, celebration called “Light It Up Blue.”

MTSU Project Help student Evan concentrates on writing his name in blue chalk for the “Light It Up Blue” celebration for autism awareness Wednesday at the North Baird Lane center. (photos courtesy of Project Help)

April is National Autism Awareness Month, and groups across America have been sharing information about the developmental disability since the 1970s. “Light It Up Blue” began in 2010 to help kick off the monthlong program and to observe World Autism Awareness Day, which is April 2.

Project Help is Rutherford County’s only community- and center-based program serving very young children, including those with special needs.

During their April 2 celebration, Project Help’s North Baird Lane and Fairview Center locations welcomed dozens of community friends, parents and several MTSU Blue Raider football players to participate in activities that included bright blue chalk and drawings in the parking lots and painting hallways blue.

Along with its status as MTSU’s signature shade, blue is associated with the advocacy organization Autism Speaks, which launched “Light It Up Blue.”

“Every year our staff, ‘Big Friend’ students and families come up with new ways to share important information with folks on campus and in the community,” Project Help Director Susan Waldrop said. “The ‘Light It Up Blue’ experience was one of their best efforts.

“The blue paint and crayon artwork from the kids was lovely and amazing. Seeing the football players and university employees exhibiting their creativity in blue chalk on our driveway was both fun and surprising!

“Our football friends designed some really cool messages referencing their autism awareness, and (Associate Athletic Director) Diane Turnham’s ‘Go Blue Raiders’ contribution was exceptionally well done in an appropriate early learning manuscript! We’re grateful to all who participated.”

Project Help student Grace adds her artistic touch to her fellow Project Help students’ artwork on the walls of the North Baird Lane center Wednesday to celebrate “Light It Up Blue” day and autism awareness.

Founded in 1983 by the late Dr. Ann Campbell, an MTSU special education professor, Project Help’s comprehensive early learning center provides inclusive classes for children ages 3 months to kindergarten, where little ones with developmental delays play and learn with those who are developing typically.

Project HELP logo“Project Help Prep” helps 3-, 4- and 5-year-olds get ready for public school.

Project Help also provides home-based services for families of children from birth to age 3 who have developmental delays.

It’s affiliated with the Tennessee Early Intervention System and provides hands-on learning experiences for MTSU and Motlow State Community College’s Nursing Program students who work with the children and staff.

Project Help will formally be renamed “The Ann Campbell Early Learning Center at Middle Tennessee State University” later this month.

For more details about Project Help and its services, visit http://www.mtsu.edu/ProjectHelp. Check out the link there to its Facebook page for more great photos.

 

April 4 ODK event at MTSU seeks True Blue student leaders

Tennnessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett, left, chats with MTSU junior Matthew Knight, who is a political science major from Russellville, Tenn., during ODK True Blue Leadership Day Friday, April 4, in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

Tennnessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett, left, chats with MTSU junior Matthew Knight, who is a political science major from Russellville, Tenn., during ODK True Blue Leadership Day Friday, April 4, in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building. (MTSU photos by Andy Heidt)

Business leaders H. Lee Martin, David McGowan and Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett will headline the second Omicron Delta Kappa True Blue Leadership Day.

The event will be held from 8 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Friday, April 4, in Simmons Amphitheatre (Room 106) of the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building. For the full schedule, visit http://capone.mtsu.edu/mtsuodk/tbd2014_html/trueblueday.html.

The ODK True Blue Leadership Day highlights the core values of the “True Blue Pledge” by educating participants about multiple aspects of leadership.

The event schedule is based on the standard course scheduling time, so students can attend sessions that fit within their class schedule.  It is free and open to all students, faculty and staff.  Refreshments will be provided throughout the sessions, and a reception will close out the day.  Students who pre-register with Susan Lyons will receive a commemorative certificate of attendance. To reserve a spot in the sessions, email Susan.Lyons@mtsu.edu.

“ODK’s True Blue Leadership Day is a great way for students to learn more about different aspects of leadership from experienced speakers who will present a series of exciting sessions,” said graduate student Matthew Hibdon, ODK secretary and former president, and a member of ODK’s National Advisory Council.

Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett addresses audience members attending the ODK True Blue Leadership Day Friday, April 4, in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building Simmons Amphitheatre.

Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett addresses audience members attending the ODK True Blue Leadership Day Friday, April 4, in the Paul W. Martin Sr. Honors Building Simmons Amphitheatre.

“We are thrilled to have speakers from the university as well as off-campus who will be able to provide valuable insight into how to become better leaders,” added Hibdon, who graduates in May with a master’s degree in administration and supervision in higher education. “In addition to the excellent speakers, students will also have the opportunity to network with other student leaders on campus.”

Dr. H. Lee Martin

Dr. H. Lee Martin

Martin is president of Trinity Foundation of East Tennessee and clinical professor of entrepreneurship in the College of Engineering at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. McGowan is president and CEO of Regents Homes LLC and Regent Development Company. Hargett is CEO of the Department of State, with oversight of nearly 400 employees.

MTSU faculty members Dusty Doddridge, Deana Raffo and David Foote will conduct other sessions.

ODK held the inaugural True Blue Leadership Day in 2012. Hibdon said the organization decided to bring the event back this year to celebrate ODK’s Centennial Celebration this year.

ODK is sponsored on campus by the University Honors College. Honors Dean John Vile serves as adviser, and Honors College Associate Dean Philip Phillips is faculty secretary.

MTSU’s ODK Circle is actively seeking new members. Juniors and seniors are eligible for initiation, and sophomores are eligible to be part of the Squire program.

University President Sidney A. McPhee is an ODK member. ODK faculty and staff members include Provost Brad Bartel, Vice President of Student Affairs Debra Sells, former Provost Kaylene Gebert, College of Education Dean Dr. Lana Seivers, College of Business Dean David Urban, College of Liberal Arts Dean Dr. Mark Byrnes; College of Liberal Arts Associate Dean Dr. Karen Petersen and Jim Williams, director of the Albert Gore Research Center.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

ODK Leadership Day flyer72

President to hold 3 town hall meetings on Quest for Student Success

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee has set three town hall meetings on campus this month to provide students, faculty and staff an opportunity to discuss the ongoing Quest for Student Success initiative.

The town hall meetings will be held in the Parliamentary Room of the MTSU Student Union on the following dates and times:

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

Dr. Sidney A. McPhee

  • 2 to 3 p.m. Tuesday, April 15.
  • 9 to 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 16.
  • 2 to 3 p.m. Thursday, April 17.

Launched in the fall, the Quest for Student Success reforms are aimed at helping MTSU students stay on track academically, resulting in more students completing their degrees. The effort is in line with Gov. Bill Haslam’s “Drive to 55” goal to extend the reach of higher education and includes a top-to-bottom review of university operations.

“I look forward to talking directly to the campus community about the goals of this effort and how it will make MTSU an even stronger educational institution for years to come,” McPhee said. “These town halls are an opportunity for stakeholders across the university to ask questions, give feedback and hopefully gain a better understanding of where our institution is heading and why.”

Among the changes being prompted by the initiative:

  • Stepping up recruitment of students who have greater potential to succeed at a four-year comprehensive university.
  • Enhancing the academic experience of enrolled students to better ensure their success, including greater tutoring, enhanced advising and an emphasis on more “high-tech and high-touch” approaches.
  • Using more innovative, data-informed best practices to facilitate success

For more information about the Quest of Student Success, go to www.mtsu.edu/studentsuccess.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)