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MTSU symposium will tackle community ‘cyberthreats’

MTSU’s 2014 Middle Tennessee Cyber Summit, set May 5-6 on campus, is aiming to help public and private-sector operations that want to protect their operations from online attack.

The theme of the summit, sponsored by MTSU’s Forensic Institute for Research and Education, is “Security Essentials.”

Click on the poster above for more information, including registration details.

It’s open to the public at no charge, organizers say, and should be of particular interest to government agencies at all levels, as well as the utility, education, health care, transportation and financial services industries and other businesses.

The summit will address criminal, intelligence, disruptive and information cyberthreats and show how a company or agency can work to protect its assets and reputation from external or internal electronic breaches of its security, confidentiality and data.

Speakers at the two-day event will include representatives from the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Microsoft Corp., digital forensics company Stroz Friedberg and RSA, the security division of data management giant EMC Corporation.

Attendees who want to earn Continuing Education Unit or Continuing Professional Education credits for the summit may do so by paying a $10 processing fee.

To register for the summit or get more information, including an agenda, please visit FIRE’s training event page, or contact FIRE at 615-898-2221 or fire@mtsu.edu.

Along with FIRE, the 2014 Middle Tennessee Cyber Summit is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

Visiting Chinese musician to perform at Walker Library April 22

The gentle, poignant tones of Chinese music will greet patrons of MTSU’s James E. Walker Library soon.

Xiaojun Huo

Xiaojun Huo, who is first chair of erhu in the folk music division of the China Opera and Dance Theater, will share her talents in a free public performance set from 2 to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 22, in the library’s first-floor atrium.

The erhu is a two-stringed, bowed musical instrument which sometimes is called a “southern fiddle,” or, in the Western world, a “Chinese violin.” Its origin can be traced to instruments introduced into China sometime in the 10th century.

An erhu is played as a solo instrument or in groups, in small ensembles as well as major orchestras. It can be used in both traditional and contemporary music arrangements.

Dr. Arunesh Nadgir, an assistant professor of piano in the MTSU School of Music, will accompany Huo during the performance.

MTSU’s Confucius Institute is sponsoring this event in collaboration with the James E. Walker Library and the MTSU School of Music.

A searchable campus map with parking details is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap13-14.

For more information, contact Dr. Guanping Zheng, director of the Confucius Institute, at 615-494-8696 or cimtsu@mtsu.edu.

Gina K. Logue (Gina.Logue@mtsu.edu)

April 23 documentary at MTSU exposes horror of ‘honor violence’

Inspired by the Arab Spring, women are beginning to speak out about an ongoing legacy of oppression.

Click on the poster to watch the “Honor Diaries” trailer before the April 23 screening at MTSU.

“Honor Diaries,” a documentary that expresses the women’s anguish, will be screened at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 23, in the State Farm Lecture Hall of MTSU’s Business and Aerospace Building.

The screening is free and open to the public.

The hourlong film focuses on so-called “honor violence,” which targets mostly women who have violated cultural beliefs and behaviors, therefore “dishonoring” their families.

Some rape victims have been murdered because they, not their attackers, are considered to have brought disgrace on their families.

“Honor Diaries” features nine courageous women’s rights advocates who speak about gender inequality, according to the movie’s website, www.honordiaries.com.

Honor violence is most widely reported in the Middle East and south Asia, and it also has been reported in Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, India, Sweden and the United States.

Victims have been shot, stoned, burned, buried alive, strangled, smothered or stabbed by their husbands, fathers or brothers in the name of restoring “honor.” Other forms of honor violence documented in the film include forced marriage and female genital mutilation.

Dr. David Schmidt

“This film is a wonderful format to encourage and inspire some discussion regarding this very important global issue,” said Dr. David Schmidt, vice provost for international affairs.

“It has already created a discussion nationally, and I am pleased we have the opportunity to screen this film at MTSU.”

According to the United Nations, there are 5,000 honor killings reported around the world every year.

A report by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe says honor violence is based on the belief that women are the property of their male relatives. Men are rarely penalized, and in the rare situations when police do intervene, the men receive reduced sentences.

“Honor Diaries” was an official selection of the Chicago International Film Festival in 2013 and winner of Best Documentary honors in the Interfaith Awards category at the 2013 St. Louis International Film Festival.

This event is presented by the MTSU Office of International Affairs. A searchable campus map with parking details is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap13-14.

For more information on the event, contact Schmidt at 615-898-2116 or david.schmidt@mtsu.edu.

Gina K. Logue (Gina.Logue@mtsu.edu)

Windham Lecture sheds light on ‘Coup’ to oust governor (+VIDEO)

Public affairs consultant and former journalist Keel Hunt brought the story of Tennessee’s unprecedented bipartisan ouster of a corrupt governor to MTSU’s renowned Windham Lecture Series Thursday night.

Keel Hunt

MTSU alumnus Hunt, author of “Coup: The Day the Democrats Ousted Their Governor, Put Republican Lamar Alexander in Office Early, and Stopped a Pardon Scandal,” was joined in MTSU’s Tucker Theatre by Alexander, now Tennessee’s senior U.S. senator; John Seigenthaler, Tennessean editor emeritus; and former U.S. Attorney Hal Hardin for an in-depth discussion of the 1979 political scandal.

Hunt was appreciative of MTSU’s invitation to share a deeper understanding of his book.

“This is where I came of age … this is where I spent my undergraduate time and made friends and associates that have been dear to me for the past 50 years,” he said. “I’m so grateful to MTSU for what this university means to our state and so many like me.”

A captive audience listened as the panel recalled the story of Tennessee’s constitutional crisis erupting 35 years ago, when then-Gov. Ray Blanton signed 52 executive clemencies, including pardons for a political pal’s son and 20 other convicted murderers, amid a growing federal investigation into a clemency-for-cash scandal.

You can watch an excerpt of their conversation below.

“One reason I wrote the book was that it was an extraordinary tale,” Hunt said. “What you’re about to hear about has never happened anywhere in our country … before 1979 and certainly not since.

“In hindsight, it’s a pretty good case study in an episode of very serious bipartisanship at a very high level in our state government.”

Leaders learned Blanton planned to issue more pardons before the newly elected governor Alexander was to be sworn in Jan. 20, 1979. Hardin, who also is an MTSU alumnus, contacted Alexander with the news.

“And I said, ‘I’m not calling you as the United States Attorney, I’m calling you as a Tennessean, and here’s what I know,’” Hardin told the audience, adding that he remembers that day’s events “like it was yesterday.”

Working with the state attorney general to determine whether an early inauguration was constitutional, Alexander, a Republican, had only a few hours to collaborate with Speaker of the House Ned Ray McWherter and Lt. Gov. John Wilder, both Democrats, to find a solution.

John Seigenthaler

Hal Hardin

U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander

They did. Alexander took the oath of office three days early in the Tennessee Supreme Court chambers, and the bipartisan scramble effectively prevented any more early releases for dangerous criminals.

Alexander recalled the angst he felt.

“I had to think about, ‘How do you do this, since it has never been done?’ Going through my mind were things like, ‘If I appear to be the usurper of power, Tennessee will be even more of a laughingstock because of the pardons.’”

Thursday night’s audience also watched archival news footage from Nashville’s WTVF-TV on the night of Jan. 17, 1979, when Alexander took the oath of office for governor.

“The days and weeks prior to this, all of the media in Tennessee was telling the story, either in print or in broadcast, the story of the scandal,” said Seigenthaler, who wrote the forward to Hunt’s book and was editor in chief of The Tennessean at the time of Blanton’s ouster.

“There were very few people in the state at the time who didn’t understand that this scandal, this crisis, was on us.”

Hunt, a former Tennessean reporter and city editor who campaigned for Alexander in the 1978 election and later became his special assistant and speechwriter, was able to interview many of the surviving participants for “Coup,” learning details that surprised even his former boss Alexander.

“I admire so much the book Keel has written because he’s collected a lot of stories I didn’t know anything about, because I was in the center of it,” Alexander said.

Hunt characterized his book as “a story of a crisis, and mainly the story of how that crisis was resolved. And the solution was a one of a kind.

“I appreciate that a lot of the appeal of the story is due to the scandal and the corruption,” he continued, “but genuinely what was more interesting to me was how these other folks worked through the solution on that afternoon. There was a crisis, but there was also the solution.

“I would say this is not so much a story about bad guys doing wrong: it’s about good guys doing right.”

MTSU’s Windham Lecture Series in Liberal Arts was established by William and Westy Windham through the MTSU Foundation.

Dr. William Windham was a member of the MTSU faculty from 1955 to 1989 and served as chairman of the Department of History the last 11 years. His first wife, the late Westy Windham, earned a master’s degree in sociology at MTSU and was the founder of the Great American Singalong. Since Westy Windham’s death, Windham and his current wife, Doris, have continued their sponsorship of the lecture series and were in attendance for Thursday night’s lecture.

The inaugural Windham Lecture in 1990 featured Drs. Dan T. Carter of Emory University and Dewey W. Grantham of Vanderbilt University, who spoke on “The South and the Second Reconstruction.” Since then, the Windham Lectures have addressed topics spanning from American music to U.S. foreign policy and have included such speakers as musician Bela Fleck, filmmaker Rory Kennedy and retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.

For more information about the lecture series, please contact the College of Liberal Arts at 615-494-7628.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu) and Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU Writing Corps to share stories at Frist Center April 17

Several members of the Writers Corps, a creative writing group of military service members and veterans who attend MTSU, will share their stories with the public April 17 at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville for a special one-night, pop-up gallery reading event.

Members of the MTSU Writers Corps, shown above, will appear April 17 at the Frist Center for Visual Arts in Nashville to share their stories. The group of military veterans tell their stories through creative writing and hold public readings throughout the year. (Submitted photo)

Members of the MTSU Writers Corps (from left to right), Kevin Sweathomas, Brian Crow, Patrick Richey, Orlandus Miles, Kevin Brown, Matthew Brown, Spencer Johnston and Marcus Mackey will appear Thursday, April 17, at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts in Nashville to share their stories. The group of military veterans tell their stories through creative writing and hold public readings throughout the year. (Submitted photo)

Members of the group will share their work at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 17, in conjunction with the exhibitions “Goya: The Disasters of War,” which features etchings of the Peninsular War of 1808-1814, and “Steve Mumford’s War Journals, 2003–2013,” which is comprised of images dealing with the American presence in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The Frist Center is located at 919 Broadway in downtown Nashville. For hours, admission and other information, www.fristcenter.org.

The MTSU Writers Corps encourages veterans to share thoughts, feelings or experiences in writing and to ultimately share their work with on- and off-campus communities through publication in their annual literary journal, “DMZ: A Journal of Contemporary Literature by Veterans.”

The informal group’s primary goal is to help veterans with their scholarly, personal, emotional and spiritual well-being, organizers say. The group provides a comfortable environment where veterans can gather among peers, and corps members say such writing eases some of the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.

To raise public awareness about the experiences of military veterans, the group holds public readings throughout the academic year, most notably at their spring journal release party and literary showcase.

For more information about the MTSU Writers Corps or Thursday’s event, contact Matthew Brown, MTSU English instructor and group founder, at matthew.brown@mtsu.edu.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU marketers mix music with generosity in April 18 charity rockfest

MTSU marketing majors are putting their music where their mouths are.

First Noelle poster webStudents in the Department of Management and Marketing are sponsoring “Rockin’ for the First Noelle,” a battle-of-the-bands benefit for the First Noelle Foundation, an organization that honors a local teenager by collecting books for children.

The event is scheduled for 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 18, at Bonhoeffer’s, located at 610 Dill Lane in Murfreesboro.

Competing musical acts include Caller 15, Michael McQuaid, Dear Salem, Amanda June, The Beasleys and Mary Howell.

Audience members may bid in a silent auction for jewelry from Francesca’s Collections, Starbucks gift cards, a Microsoft Office software package, a HotSpot tanning gift set and many more donated items.

The First Noelle Foundation was created in memory of Siegel High School student Miranda “Noelle” Henson, a 17-year-old senior who was killed in a single-car accident on the way to a school ball game in 2011.

The nonprofit organization collects books to be distributed for reading by kindergartners throughout Rutherford County. Its motto is “spreading a legacy one child and one book at a time.”

Proceeds from “Rockin’ for the First Noelle” will be used to create a foundation website.

Tickets are $5 each in advance or at the door and may be purchased in advance at thefirstnoelleorg@gmail.com.

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/TheFirstNoelleFoundation or follow @FirstNoelleOrg on Twitter.

Gina K. Logue (Gina.Logue@mtsu.edu)

Long-term donors celebrated at MTSU 1911 Society Luncheon

MTSU recognized community members who have made financial commitments to the university for the long term during Friday’s second annual 1911 Society Luncheon in the Student Union Ballroom.

Joe Bales, left, MTSU vice president for university advancement, and Bill Mooningham, right, president of the MTSU Foundation, honor donor Alee Clark at the second annual 1911 Society Luncheon for those who have created planned gifts benefitting the university. The luncheon was held Friday, April 11, in the Student Union Ballroom. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

Joe Bales, left, MTSU vice president for university advancement, and Bill Mooningham, right, president of the MTSU Foundation, honor donor Alee Clark at the second annual 1911 Society Luncheon for those who have created planned gifts benefitting the university. The luncheon was held Friday, April 11, in the Student Union Ballroom. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

The group, named in honor of MTSU’s founding year, celebrates individuals and families who have created gifts to the university through their estate plans. New members of the 1911 Society receive a framed rendering of Kirksey Old Main.

New members honored Friday included: Steve and Kathy Anderson, Alee Clark,
 Gayle H. and Dwayne Duke, Jean Gould, Margaret R. Hall, Richard Key, 
Rita S. King,
 Paul W. Martin Jr., Karen and Toby Mongan, Andrew and Elise Oppmann, Gayle Ray, and
 Mary Secrest.

Also celebrated at the April 11 event were certain members of the Signal Society, which honors annual donors who have supported the university in 20 or more years. This group is named for Middle Tennessee Normal School’s first newspaper/magazine, The Signal, which was originally published in 1912.

PrintThose recognized Friday were Signal Society members who had reached the 40-year plus milestone. Donors are given an engraved medallion reflecting their years of support.

This year’s group included: H. Dalton and Cynthia Drennan, Barbara and Jerre Haskew, Dan and Margaret Scott, David and Lorraine Singer, and Tommy and Judy Smith.

For more information about becoming an MTSU donor, go to www.mtsu.edu/development and choose from the selection of tabs about giving on the left.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

MTSU students John N. Sloss, left, and Emily West spoke at the 1911 Society Luncheon about how donor contributions provide the necessary scholarships and infrastructure improvements to hlep students like them succeed. The event, held Friday, April 11, in the Student Union Ballroom, honored those who have created planned gifts benefitting the university.

MTSU students John N. Sloss, left, and Emily West spoke at the 1911 Society Luncheon about how donor contributions provide the necessary scholarships and infrastructure improvements to help students like them succeed. The event, held Friday, April 11, in the Student Union Ballroom, honored those who have created planned gifts benefiting the university.

MTSU donors Tommy and Judy Smith were recognized Friday, April 11, during the second annual 1911 Society Luncheon honoring those who have created planned gifts benefitting the university. The Smiths were among several donors recognized for their 40-years plus of giving. The luncheon was held in the Student Union Ballroom.

MTSU donors Tommy and Judy Smith were recognized Friday, April 11, during the second annual 1911 Society Luncheon honoring those who have created planned gifts benefitting the university. The Smiths were among several donors recognized for their 40-years plus of giving. The luncheon was held in the Student Union Ballroom.

MTSU Blue Raider Debate team hosts national tourney (+VIDEO)

The MTSU Blue Raider Debate team is hosting the International Public Debate Association’s National Championship Tournament and Convention for colleges and universities this week.

The tournament, which is open to the public, runs Thursday-Sunday, April 10-13, with debate rounds starting in the morning and continuing throughout the day at various buildings on campus. The tournament and convention concludes with an awards banquet set for noon to 3 p.m. Sunday, April 13, in the Student Union.

A printable campus map with parking instructions is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap13-14.

Organizers expect almost 300 competitors from 33 colleges and universities in 13 states to visit campus and showcase their debating skills. Registered schools include Boise State, Southern Illinois and the United States Military Academy at West Point, with categories including novice, varsity and professional divisions. In IPDA formats, debaters primarily go one-on-one with various time limits.

“It’s the largest tournament that IPDA has ever hosted,” said Dr. Patrick Richey, MTSU debate team coach and a member of the IPDA governing board.

As his opponent takes notes, MTSU student Marquwan Fultz, a sophomore mass communication major and a member of the Blue Raider Debate Team, makes his argument to the judge Friday, April 11, inside the Bragg Mass Communication Building during a round of the IPDA National Tournament hosted by MTSU. (Photos by MTSU News and Media Relations)

As his opponent takes notes, MTSU student Marquwan Fultz, a sophomore mass communication major and a member of the Blue Raider Debate Team, makes his argument to the judge Friday, April 11, inside the Bragg Mass Communication Building during a round of the IPDA National Tournament hosted by MTSU. (Photos by MTSU News and Media Relations)

Richey noted that to his knowledge, this marks the first time the national tournament is being hosted on the MTSU campus and it comes as the MTSU debate team completes its third year of returning to competition after being dormant for a number of years.

“It’s a monumental task to go from a nonexistent team more or less to hosting a national tournament,” said Richey, director of forensics at MTSU. “I think it brings huge prestige for the university and the state to be the school chosen for this event.”

Dr. Patrick Richey

Dr. Patrick Richey

Richey, who said he has coordinated two national debate tournaments in the past, submitted a bid to host the tournament and attributes the opportunity to host the tournament to MTSU’s location and the quality of its debate team.

Richey said MTSU is fielding 13 students in the tournament, with another 10 debate team members needed to help him with the logistics of hosting an event that will likely involve 600-plus attendees when visiting faculty and judges are factored in.

MTSU debaters will be from Richey’s Communications 3210 Argumentation course as part of the Experiential Learning, or EXL, project. Richey said he’s fielding some of his least experienced debaters because his veterans are needed to serve as hosts.

“But I think we’re going to do pretty well,” he said.

Top sponsors of the national tournament are the MTSU College of Graduate Studies and the Belmont School of Law.

Founded with the university in 1911, the MTSU Debate Team was revamped in 2011. In October 2012, the team hosted its first tournament on campus in nearly a decade and now participates in debates throughout the region.

For more information about MTSU Blue Raider Debate, contact Richey at 615-898-2273 or email him at Patrick.Richey@mtsu.edu. You can also visit www.mtsu.edu/debate/index.php.

— Jimmy Hart (jimmy.hart@mtsu.edu)

These trophies shown Friday, April 11, inside the Bragg Mass Communication Building will eventually find an owner when the IPDA National Debate Tournament wraps up this weekend on the MTSU campus. The MTSU Blue Raider Debate Team hosted the tournament, which drew close to 300 competitors from 33 schools in 13 states.

These trophies shown Friday, April 11, inside the Bragg Mass Communication Building will eventually find an owner when the IPDA National Debate Tournament wraps up this weekend on the MTSU campus. The MTSU Blue Raider Debate Team hosted the tournament, which drew close to 300 competitors from 33 schools in 13 states.

The Bragg Mass Communication Building atrium was packed Friday, April 11, as debate teams from throughout the country gathered for the 2014 International Public Debate Association's National Tournament hosted by the MTSU Blue Raider Debate Team. (Photos by MTSU News and Media Relations)

The Bragg Mass Communication Building atrium was packed Friday, April 11, as debate teams from throughout the country gathered for the 2014 International Public Debate Association’s National Tournament hosted by the MTSU Blue Raider Debate Team. 

‘Drowsy Chaperone’ romps onstage through April 13 (+VIDEOS)

A starstruck musical theater lover’s imagination is coming to life on MTSU’s Tucker Theatre stage through April 13 with a family-friendly comedy that’s a dream come true for at least two of its actors.

MTSU senior Joshua Hosale, as “Man in Chair,” listens enraptured to fellow senior Alicia Puckett’s over-the-top character, “The Drowsy Chaperone,” in the new MTSU Theatre production of the same name. Performances are set April 9-12 at 7:30 each evening in Tucker Theatre and 2 p.m. April 13. (MTSU photo by J. Intintoli)

“The Drowsy Chaperone,” a five-time 2006 Tony Award-winning musical, is a Cole Porter-esque parody, a show within a show, complete with 1920s stock characters romping across the set while a bashful Broadway fanatic provides running commentary.

Tickets are still available for the MTSU Arts production at www.mtsu.edu/tuckertheatre. Curtain times are 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, April 9-12, and 2 p.m. Sunday, April 13.

Advance general admission tickets are $10 each and $5 for K-12 students and senior citizens when purchased online and $12 and $7 at the door. MTSU students with valid IDs will be admitted free.

“This actually is one of my dream roles,” explains MTSU senior Joshua Hosale of Antioch, Tenn., whose “Man in Chair” narrates the onstage festivities he’s imagining in his dreary apartment as he plays the soundtrack of his favorite — nonexistent — 1928 musical.

“I listened to the (Broadway) soundtrack long ago and knew every part. It’s so great for me to get to do this role early in my career. ‘Man in Chair’ actually is a lot like me; I annoy my friends because I love finding out random tidbits. … ‘Man in Chair’ is the person who has to put in his two cents’ worth, all the time.”

Fellow senior Alicia Pickett of Chattanooga is the kohl-eyed, wildly dramatic and usually quite tipsy “Chaperone” who swans across the stage and in and out of the “Man’s” imagination.

Click on the poster for a direct link to buy tickets online in advance and save $2 per ticket!

“I did some research and kind of wanted to be ‘Janet,’” Pickett says, referring to the imaginary musical’s female lead who’s the Chaperone’s charge. “Then, when I saw the Chaperone, I thought, ‘Hey, this sounds like the better deal.’ I’ve really fallen in love with this character. We’re both fabulous, but she’s more fabulous than I am.

The story within “The Drowsy Chaperone” follows, as it were, the misadventures of a Broadway star and her ambivalence about her upcoming wedding to an oil tycoon. There’s also an imperturbable English butler, a ditzy scheming flapper, less-than-cleverly-disguised gangsters, a self-proclaimed Latin lover, a baffled best man and an aviatrix involved in enough mistaken identities, spit takes, tap dancing, roller-skating and wild dance numbers to keep an audience giggling long after the curtain falls.

Professor Kristi Shamburger

The 22-member MTSU cast auditioned last December and started rehearsals in early February, working through their spring break for seven hours each day and “really digging in and getting a professional feel, because that’s what you do as a professional, when you’re not auditioning: spend hours in rehearsals,” explains director Kristi Shamburger, a Department of Speech and Theatre professor at MTSU.

Shamburger, who helmed last fall’s blockbuster MTSU Theatre and Music production of “Les Misérables” with School of Music professor Raphael Bundage, says she’s using one word to describe “Drowsy Chaperone” to everyone who asks.

“Fun!” Shamburger shouts with a grin. “There’s a connection for everybody at some point in this play. It’s just a jewel. There’s farce, there’s mistaken identity — it’s going to hit every generation.

“The older generation in our audience will be touched in a sentimental way and remember times gone by. Our ‘Man in Chair’ is going to hit home with much of our contemporary audience, and the physical comedy will appeal to the very young, too.”

Pickett agrees, adding that she expects theatergoers to “be walking out with a big smile on your face. You should never miss out on this.”

The “Man in Chair,” Hosale notes, is “really your guide to finding yourself and whatever it is you like to do, whether it’s musical theater, building cars or flying airplanes.

“I can’t wait until the auditorium is filled and we get to share this wonderful story,” Hosale adds with a bright smile.

Tickets for “The Drowsy Chaperone” also are available online at http://middletennstate.showclix.com. You can call 888-71-TICKETS (888-718-4253) 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday to order tickets by phone.

— Gina E. Fann (gina.fann@mtsu.edu)

 

 

MTSU Wind Ensemble reunites with Lindemann in free April 10 concert

MTSU’s Wind Ensemble will close its 2013-14 season, which featured the international release of a second Naxos classical CD, with a free public concert at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 10, in Hinton Music Hall inside MTSU’s Wright Music Building.

Renowned trumpeter Jens Lindemann will perform with the MTSU Wind Ensemble in a special free concert on April 10 in the Hinton Music Hall on campus. (photo submitted)

MTSU’s premier performing ensemble for wind, brass and percussion students will be joined in their special concert by a return guest, world-renowned trumpet soloist Jens Lindemann, who performed with the group at their spring 2013 closing concert.

Lindemann, a former member of the Canadian Brass who has recorded with the Mormon Tabernacle Choir and presented a solo Royal Command Performance for Queen Elizabeth II, has performed as a soloist and recording artist with classical stars such as Sir Neville Marriner, Sir Angel Romero, Doc Severinsen, Charles Dutoit, Gerard Schwarz, Eiji Oue and Bramwell Tovey.

At the April 10 concert, Lindemann will perform two selections with the Wind Ensemble. You can watch one of his spring 2013 performances with the MTSU Wind Ensemble below.

MTSU’s Wind Ensemble continues to stand alone among Tennessee university bands after this winter’s release of its second CD, “Earthrise,” a collaboration with three international composers, on one of the world’s most prestigious classical labels.

MTSU boasts the only university band in Tennessee with recordings released by Naxos of America, the Franklin, Tenn., U.S. headquarters for the Hong Kong-based Naxos classical music group.

Dr. Reed Thomas, director of bands and a professor of music and conducting in MTSU’s renowned School of Music, conducted the Wind Ensemble for “Earthrise” as well as the 2011 release “Angels in the Architecture.” Thomas also will conduct the April 10 concert in Hinton Hall.

You can learn more about the MTSU Wind Ensemble and its latest CD at http://mtsunews.com/wind-ensemble-2nd-naxos-cd. Lindemann offers more details about his music at his website, www.trumpetsolo.com.

For more information on this and other MTSU School of Music events, call 615-898-2493 or visit www.mtsumusic.com and click on the “Concert Calendar” link.