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MTSU physics department earns acclaim for student ...

MTSU physics department earns acclaim for student success

MTSU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy has been recognized nationally for improving undergraduate physics education for its students.

The department was one of three programs honored nationwide by the American Physical Society, a physics and science education advocacy organization.

In this 2012 file photo, Eric Guyes, left, and Ebony Rowe collaborate on a physics experiment. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

Eric Guyes, left, and Ebony Rowe collaborate on a physics experiment in this 2012 file photo. (MTSU photos by J. Intintoli)

MTSU received the honor, in part, for “consciously adopting a mission to provide exceptional classroom experiences, career-focused courses and pathways and intensive research opportunities to prepare students for targeted careers,” said Deanna Ratnikova, women and education programs administrator with the American Physical Society.

“It’s truly nice to receive national recognition,” said Dr. Ron Henderson, physics department chair, who said the honor also relates to an on-campus award from MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee in August 2013 as part of the university’s Quest for Student Success initiative to improve student retention and boost graduation rates.

“That award (from the president) came in competition with other departments on campus,” Henderson said. “The American Physical Society award followed a nationwide search. Every physics department in the country was eligible.”

University Provost Brad Bartel noted that the physics department “has been devoted to undergraduate student success for many years.”

In this 2012 file photo, Jacob Hodovsky, left, and Daniel Murphy listen as associate professor Chuck Higgins describes a physics concept. (MTSU file photo by J. Intintoli)

Jacob Hodovsky, left, and Daniel Murphy listen as associate professor Chuck Higgins describes a physics concept in this 2012 file photo.

“They collectively changed their curriculum and gave the students more applied opportunities,” Bartel added.

“The national recognition for their efforts is well-deserved, and their work has produced dozens of students highly qualified for graduate school and employment.”

Calling MTSU “among the most successful PhysTEC sites,” the American Physical Society also recognized ]Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne and Rochester Institute of Technology.

Physics Teacher Education Coalition, or PhysTEC, helps universities develop their physics teacher education programs into national models.

MTSU earned the award and the society’s praise because “the department
has over the past half-decade successfully refocused its degree programs
and course offerings to emphasize the possibilities inherent in a wide
range of career choices beyond graduate programs in physics, including
teaching careers, and teaches the skills necessary to attain them, including freshman career seminars, required capstone research
experiences and a senior-level career skills course.”

Henderson received the plaque during the April meeting of the American Physical Society in Baltimore, Maryland. The plaque bears the signatures of society President M.R. Beasley and CEO Kate P. Kirby.

Part of the MTSU Department of Physics and Astronomy faculty pose with the American Physics Society Committee on Education award for Improving Undergraduate Physics Education. Faculty include (front row, from left) Brian Frank, Martha Weller, chair Ron Henderson and John Wallin; and (back row, from left) Daniel Erenso, Irina Perevalova, Eric Klumpe, Jana Ruth Ford and Chuck Higgins. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

Members of the MTSU Department of Physics and Astronomy faculty pose with the American Physics Society Committee on Education award for Improving Undergraduate Physics Education. They include, front row, from left, Brian Frank, Martha Weller, chair Ron Henderson and John Wallin, and back row, from left, Daniel Erenso, Irina Perevalova, Eric Klumpe, Jana Ruth Ford and Chuck Higgins. (Photo by MTSU News and Media Relations)

Henderson andMTSU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy built a solid case in the entry submission with an 11-page document that featured reports of individual students’ success and growth in retention and academic performance.

The physics department averages 13 graduates per year. Trends suggest an increase in this number in the coming years, the chair said.

“Our numbers of freshmen and sophomores have really shot up,” Henderson said, “and we’re expecting 40 to 50 new physics majors this fall. We’re one of the small departments on campus, but we’re experiencing some really good trends.”

“Our presence on campus is larger because many students take physics, not just physics majors.”

Non-physics majors taking classes include students in aerospace, engineering technology and those in pre-health, including medical and dental studies.

MTSU’s Department of Physics and Astronomy awaits the renovation of Wiser-Patten Science Hall by 2016. Henderson said he anticipates the department’s physical space will increase from 50 to 75 percent.

The department is one of 11 in the College of Basic and Applied Sciences. For more information about the programs, visit www.mtsu.edu/programs/physics or www.mtsu.edu/programs/astronomy or call 615-898-2130.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)

The American Physical Society's plaque presented to MTSU notes the physics departmentas being selected as a 2014-17 Department of Distinction "for supporting best practices in education at the undergraduate level." (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

The American Physical Society’s plaque presented to MTSU notes the physics department was selected as a 2014-17 Department of Distinction “for supporting best practices in education at the undergraduate level.” (Photo by MTSU News and Media Relations)


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