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Lecture at MTSU examines links between African-Ame...

Lecture at MTSU examines links between African-American women, slavery, religion

promo for “Female Captive to Negro Wench: Slavery in Religious and Gendered Perspective” lecture by Dr. Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh of Vanderbilt

MTSU’s Africana Studies and Religious Studies programs are joining forces to celebrate their first-year anniversaries with a special event combining perspectives from both fields on Tuesday, April 10.

poster for Dr Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh’s April 2018 lecture, ““Female Captive to Negro Wench: Slavery in Religious and Gendered Perspective”“Female Captive to Negro Wench: Slavery in Religious and Gendered Perspective” is the title of a free public lecture and lunch event scheduled for 1 to 2:30 p.m. April 10 in the Parliamentary Room, Room 201, of the Student Union.

A campus parking map is available at http://tinyurl.com/MTSUParkingMap. Off-campus visitors attending the lecture can obtain a special one-day permit at www.mtsu.edu/parking/visit.php. Lunches will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Dr. Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh, an assistant professor of religious studies, American religious history and African-American religious history at Vanderbilt University, will deliver the presentation.

Dr. Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh, assistant professor of religious studies, American religious history and African-American religious history at Vanderbilt University

Dr. Alexis Wells-Oghoghomeh

Wells-Oghoghomeh is an historian of African-American religion with a primary interest in the sacred cultures of enslaved people in the American South. Her research explores religious exchanges and productions within the African, Atlantic, colonial and antebellum Southern cultures, the religiosity of race in the United States, and women’s religious histories.

She recently received fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and the Young Scholars in American Religion Program.

MTSU’s Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, the Africana Studies Program and the Religious Studies Association are sponsoring the lecture.

For more information, contact Dr. Rebekka King, assistant professor of religious studies, at 615-494-8987 or rebekka.king@mtsu.edu.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)


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