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‘MTSU On the Record’ ventures into Kenya’s politic...

‘MTSU On the Record’ ventures into Kenya’s politics, poaching crackdown, more with global studies professor

An MTSU professor presented his honest views on controversies facing the African nation of Kenya on a recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Jeremiah Asaka, lecturer in the Department of Global Studies and Human Geography, College of Liberal Arts

Dr. Jeremiah Asaka

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Jeremiah Asaka, a lecturer in MTSU’s Department of Global Studies and Human Geography, first aired Oct. 30 on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and online at www.wmot.org. You can listen to their conversation above.

In a series of commentaries posted at www.theconversation.com, Asaka took on some of his native land’s thorniest issues.

The topics included Kenya’s 2017 presidential election, the nation’s new wildlife task force and a controversial proposal to execute convicted poachers. (You can read each of Asaka’s articles by clicking on the links.)

WMOT Roots Radio-new logo-2017 web “More and more countries are moving away from executions,” Asaka said.

“It’s almost ridiculous to propose that you would execute a human being for killing an animal, not that I’m diminishing the lives of animals. From my end, I think this proposal is actually a nonstarter.”

Asaka is an interdisciplinary scholar researching conservation governance and the biodiversity-security nexus in sub-Saharan Africa with particular focus on Kenya.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about “MTSU On the Record,” contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

Pastoralist communities in Africa, like the Maasai, and their livestock live in “bomas,” which protect them from wild animals. Kenya’s Minister for Tourism and Wildlife recently established a task force to look into how wildlife can be used and protected in a way that benefits both people and animals. (Photo by Shutterstock/Papa Bravo via TheConversation.com)

Pastoralist communities in Africa, like the Maasai, and their livestock live in “bomas,” which protect them from wild animals. Kenya’s Minister for Tourism and Wildlife recently established a task force to look into how wildlife can be used and protected in a way that benefits both people and animals. (Photo by Shutterstock/Papa Bravo via TheConversation.com)

Kenya Wildlife Service rangers patrol the Meru National Park on the slopes of Mount Kenya in eastern Africa. The nation is considering implementing the death penalty for wildlife poaching to help endangered species survive and to protect the Kenyan tourism industry. (Photo courtesy of Flickr/IFAW via TheConversation.com)

Kenya Wildlife Service rangers patrol the Meru National Park on the slopes of Mount Kenya in eastern Africa. The nation is considering implementing the death penalty for wildlife poaching to help endangered species survive and to protect the Kenyan tourism industry. (Photo courtesy of Flickr/IFAW via TheConversation.com)

 


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