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Sign up now for MTSU’s 14th biennnial Holocaust St...

Sign up now for MTSU’s 14th biennnial Holocaust Studies Conference Sept. 22-23

Registration is open for one of MTSU’s most enlightening events about one of the world’s most devastating tragedies.

The 14th biennial Holocaust Studies Conference is slated for Thursday, Sept. 22, and Friday, Sept. 23, on the MTSU campus with the theme of “Teaching the Holocaust Today.”

To register and for cost details, go to https://tinyurl.com/2nu539y8.

Dr. Atina Grossman (Photo submitted)
Dr. Atina Grossman

Atina Grossman, a professor of history at The Cooper Union in New York City, will present the keynote address at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, in the Student Union Ballroom. The event is free and open to all MTSU students, faculty and staff.

In her lecture, titled “Remapping Holocaust Studies: Teaching and Research in Global Context,” Grossman will consider how to help students recognize connections between the Holocaust and racism, antisemitism and colonialism while continuing to acknowledge the Holocaust’s uniqueness in history.

Other issues Grossman will consider include the challenges of achieving a deeper understanding of the Holocaust and the non-Western world and teaching Holocaust studies as the liberal arts come under question in some arenas of the academic community.

MTSU Holocaust Studies Program logo

Grossman is the 2022-23 Ina Levine Invitational Senior Scholar at the Mandel Center of the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. Her current research focuses on Jewish refugees from Nazism in Iran, India and Central Asia in transnational context.

The late Dr. Nancy Rupprecht, a professor of history and driving force behind Holocaust Studies at MTSU for many years, shares a light-hearted moment with Sonja Dubois, who survived the Holocaust as a child, at the 2015 Holocaust Studies Conference at MTSU. Dubois is scheduled to attend the 2022 conference Sept. 22-23.
The late Dr. Nancy Rupprecht, a professor of history and driving force behind Holocaust Studies at MTSU for many years, shares a light-hearted moment with Sonja Dubois, who survived the Holocaust as a child, at the 2015 Holocaust Studies Conference at MTSU. Dubois is scheduled to attend the 2022 conference Sept. 22-23. (Photo from Holocaust Studies website)

Another highlight of this year’s conference will be a Friday, Sept. 23, appearance by Sonja Dubois, a resident of Knoxville, Tennessee, who will share her survival story at the conference. Born in 1940 in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, Dubois’ parents were transported to the notorious Auschwitz death camp in 1942.

Dubois will give a talk titled “Finding Schifrah: A Holocaust Child Survivor’s Journey and the Making of a Memoir” and answer questions from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom, after which she will have a book signing for her book, “Finding Schifrah,” which explores her journey as an adult to uncover the truth of her identity and understand her Jewish heritage.

Dubois will be joined for the MTSU discussion by the co-editors of her memoir, Alice Catherine Carls and Hanno Weitering. This event is free and open to the public.

Sonja Dubois, Holocaust survivor
Sonja Dubois

A Dutch foster family raised her without telling her initially about what happened to her biological parents. In hundreds of speeches and visits to schools, Dubois has talked about her lifelong search for understanding. 

Though the event was canceled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, MTSU’s Holocaust Studies Conference has been a biennial opportunity for scholars from around the world to share their research and insights with students.

Their work focuses on the many facets of Nazi Germany’s systematic extermination of some 6 million Jews from 1941 to 1945 on the false premise that people of Aryan heritage represented a “master race” and were the only ones fit to survive. Other victims of Nazi persecution included homosexuals, ethnic Poles, Roma and Afro-Germans.

Full registration for the conference is $100. Graduate student and contingent faculty registration is $50. Registration for MTSU and high school students and teachers with meals is $30. Registration without meals is free for high school students and teachers, international participants and MTSU students, faculty and staff.

The Holocaust Studies Conference is sponsored by the MTSU Holocaust Studies Program and the College of Liberal Arts. For more information, visit www.mtsu.edu/holocaust_studies/conference.php/php.

— Gina K. Logue (gina.logue@mtsu.edu)

This MTSU student poster from the 2018 Holocaust Studies Conference exhibit explains the Homomonument, a memorial erected in 1987 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. It was the first monument to gay men and lesbians who were persecuted and killed by the Nazis for their sexual orientation. The pink triangle represents a cloth badge that Nazis forced LGBTQ individuals to wear.
This MTSU student poster from the 2018 Holocaust Studies Conference exhibit explains the Homomonument, a memorial erected in 1987 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. It was the first monument to gay men and lesbians who were persecuted and killed by the Nazis for their sexual orientation. The pink triangle represents a cloth badge that Nazis forced LGBTQ individuals to wear. (Photo from Holocaust Studies Conference website)

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