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‘MTSU On the Record’ searches for qualified STEM-t...

‘MTSU On the Record’ searches for qualified STEM-trained employees

Sam Zaza, an assistant professor of information systems, at left in inset, and Kristie Abston, an associate professor of management, at right in inset, will discuss the dearth of science, technology, engineering and mathematics specialists in the Southeast on the next edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program. Host Gina Logue’s interview with the MTSU faculty members will air from 9:30 to 10 p.m. Tuesday, May 24, and from 6 to 6:30 a.m. Sunday, May 29, on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org. (MTSU photos of Zaza and Abston; MTSU file photo of STEM education camp by Cat Curtis Murphy)

A dearth of science, technology, engineering and mathematics specialists in the Southeast was the topic on a recent edition of the “MTSU On the Record” radio program.

Dr. Ibtissam “Sam” Zaza, assistant professor, Department of Information Systems and Analytics, Jones College of Business
Dr. Ibtissam “Sam” Zaza
Dr. Kristie Abston, Department of Management, Jones College of Business
Dr. Kristie Abston

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Drs. Sam Zaza, an assistant professor of information systems, and Kristie Abston, an associate professor of management, first aired May 24 on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and www.wmot.org.

You can listen to their conversation via the SoundCloud link below.

Zaza and Abston were joined in their study of STEM-related jobs in the Tennessee Valley Corridor by two MTSU colleagues: Patrick Geho, executive director of the Tennessee Small Business Development Center, and Murat Arik, holder of the Chair of Excellence in Urban and Regional Planning in the Jennings A. Jones College of Business.

The research team surveyed more than 1,000 managers and executives in five Southeastern states, including Tennessee.

More than 50% said there aren’t enough quality workers being produced for STEM positions in their states. Nearly 52% said their businesses will suffer as a result.

WMOT Roots Radio 89.5 FM logo

“Employers can recruit from whoever is in the market, but the problem actually is beyond just the labor market itself,” Zaza said. “We need to have a step back and look at the whole STEM pipeline.”

The study, titled “Managerial Perceptions of STEM Workforce Supply and Demand Issues,” was published in the summer 2020 edition of “Global Journal of Management and Marketing.”

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about the radio program, contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.

Participants enjoy one of the experiment stations at the 25th annual Tennessee Girls in STEM Conference at MTSU held in the Science Building Saturday, April 9. About 100 middle and 75 high school girls participated in the event that was all about science, technology, engineering and math. (MTSU photo by Cat Murphy Curtis)
Participants enjoy one of the experiment stations at the 25th annual Tennessee Girls in STEM Conference at MTSU held in the Science Building Saturday, April 9. About 100 middle and 75 high school girls participated in the event that was all about science, technology, engineering and math. (MTSU photo by Cat Murphy Curtis)

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