Click here for information and updates about the University’s response to COVID-19.
MTSU
READING

As MTSU builds Kentucky prospects through True Blu...

As MTSU builds Kentucky prospects through True Blue Tour, this counselor’s doing her part

LEXINGTON and LOUISVILLE, Ky. — After handing Amy Medley the microphone to talk to the audience of prospective Louisville students and their parents this week, Middle Tennessee State University President Sidney A. McPhee may want to request she speak at future recruiting events.

“I’m ready to do it,” said Medley, a professional school counselor at J.M. Atherton High School, just before leaving at the conclusion of the tour event. With two sons of her own currently attending the Murfreesboro university, Medley spent five minutes telling parents their teenager would be in excellent hands at MTSU.

MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, right, talks to prospective students in Lexington, Ky., on Tuesday, Nov. 1, about university programs, student success, caring faculty and more. The Murfreesboro, Tenn., university visited Lexington and Louisville as part of the 14-city True Blue Tour to recruit students this fall for 2023 and beyond. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)
MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee, right, talks to prospective students in Lexington, Ky., on Tuesday, Nov. 1, about university programs, student success, caring faculty and more. The Murfreesboro, Tenn., university visited Lexington and Louisville as part of the 14-city True Blue Tour to recruit students this fall for 2023 and beyond. (MTSU photo by Randy Weiler)

Stops in Lexington and Louisville Nov. 1-2 were part of the 14-city True Blue Tour, as MTSU staff and administrators visit nine Tennessee cities, plus Atlanta, Georgia, and Birmingham and Huntsville, Alabama, recruiting students for 2023 and beyond. 

The Lexington visit netted a transfer, Deshaun Staley, a sophomore history major at another Tennessee university.

McPhee tells students, parents and counselors about MTSU programs (including nursing, accounting, concrete and construction management and more), rankings by national organizations, diversity, campus safety and more.

Kentucky students learned about MTSU’s Regional Scholars Program and Academic Common Market. For qualifying students, their out-of-state tuition will be greatly reduced.

Prospective Middle Tennessee State University student Julia Watkins, left, an Eastern High School senior, and her parents, Mike and Laura Watkins, listen as Amy Medley, right, a Louisville high school counselor and also an MTSU parent, answers questions and advisers her on what to expect if she attends the Murfreesboro, Tenn., university. Julia Watkins, who plans to major in music business in the College of Media and Entertainment, has applied and been accepted to attend MTSU. (MTSU photo by David Foster)
Prospective Middle Tennessee State University student Julia Watkins, left, an Eastern High School senior, and her parents, Mike and Laura Watkins, listen as Amy Medley, right, a Louisville high school counselor and also an MTSU parent, answers questions and advisers her on what to expect if she attends the Murfreesboro, Tenn., university. Julia Watkins, who plans to major in music business in the College of Media and Entertainment, has applied and been accepted to attend MTSU. (MTSU photo by David Foster)

“Your child will be fine. I’m a high school counselor and I’ve trusted my babies to go to MTSU,” said Medley, who shared about “wraparound medical services,” that it’s an easily walkable campus with green space and tailgating fun. “Both have had wonderful experiences. Get involved — whether pledging with a fraternity or sorority or intramural soccer — for a true four-year experience.”

Jack Medley is a junior aerospace professional pilot major. Sophomore Grant Medley is a music business major.

McPhee and Amy Medley shared a laugh with the audience regarding Jack Harlow, an American rapper and one of Atherton High’s most noted alumni, who performed earlier this fall in front of a capacity crowd of students and others in MTSU’s Murphy Center. McPhee admitted he was not familiar with Harlow, learning more about him from his own adult children, Sidney Jr. and Seneca.

Medley and Marc Monroe, a Butler Traditional High School counselor attending for the first time, received $3,000 scholarships to share with their students.

In Lexington, Bryan Station counselor Yvette Thompson said her daughter, Hillary Thompson, who wants to pursue a premed pathway to be a dermatologist, might pursue biology and minor in public health and Spanish. She’s strong academically (3.8 GPA and 29 ACT).

As his father, Dylan Owens, left, shares the moment, Chaz Owens receives a $10,000 scholarship from MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee during the True Blue Tour student reception in Louisville, Ky., Nov. 2, at the Marriott East. They drove 90 minutes to attend the tour event held Nov. 1 in Lexington, Ky., but planned to attend both, in hopes of winning a scholarship. Chaz Owens is an Atherton High School baseball player planning to study music business at MTSU. (MTSU photo by David Foster)
As his father, Dylan Owens, left, shares the moment, Chaz Owens receives a $10,000 scholarship from MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee during the True Blue Tour student reception in Louisville, Ky., Nov. 2, at the Marriott East. They drove 90 minutes to attend the tour event held Nov. 1 in Lexington, Ky., but planned to attend both, in hopes of winning a scholarship. Chaz Owens is an Atherton High School baseball player planning to study music business at MTSU. (MTSU photo by David Foster)

Second time’s the charm

Father and son Dylan and Chaz Owens of Louisville drove about 90 minutes to Lexington for the Tuesday, Nov. 1, tour event at the Origin Hotel. An Atherton senior baseball player wanting to study music business, their 15-minute drive from home to the Marriott East Wednesday, Nov. 2, was in pursuit of a hoped-for scholarship.

Their determination was rewarded when the president drew Chaz Owens’ name on a last-chance opportunity. His luck came after Brady Johnson, 15, of Louisville, a sophomore from Oldham County High School who wants to be a pro pilot major and pursue the Delta Propel option (a partnership aerospace has with the airline to get MTSU graduates hired), received a $10,000 scholarship that MTSU will hold until he graduates.

“This means a lot — a lot of weight is off my shoulders. It was worth the drive for sure,” Chaz Owens said.

Johnson, a taekwondo enthusiast, has a 3.5 GPA and 29 pre-ACT, with plans to take again. He attended with his parents, Angela Aebersold, a Navy veteran, and Chris Johnson, an Army veteran. 

Future MTSU student Deshaun Staley, left, of Lexington, Ky., gives his mother, Racquel Johnson, a university blanket he won as a gift through a drawing during the Nov. 1 True Blue Tour student reception at the Origin Hotel. A sophomore history major and former Tates Creek High School student, Staley plans to transfer from another university. He also received a $1,000 book scholarship from MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee. Interim admissions Director Tony Strode, right, observes. (MTSU photo by David Foster)
Future MTSU student Deshaun Staley, left, of Lexington, Ky., gives his mother, Racquel Johnson, a university blanket he won as a gift through a drawing during the Nov. 1 True Blue Tour student reception at the Origin Hotel. A sophomore history major and former Tates Creek High School student, Staley plans to transfer from another university. He also received a $1,000 book scholarship from MTSU President Sidney A. McPhee. Interim admissions Director Tony Strode, right, observes. (MTSU photo by David Foster)

Young achievers

Maria Kozal, 17, a Sacred Heart Academy junior with a 4.0 GPA and 33 ACT that would qualify her for MTSU Honor College consideration, wants to pursue a pro pilot major. She visited MTSU this summer “and I really love the flight program.” Working on obtaining her pilot’s license, she’s preparing to fly solo.

Kozal’s name was drawn for a gift blanket she presented to her parents, Beth and David Kozal. McPhee also gave her a $1,000 book scholarship.

In Lexington, Reagan Carr, a junior at West Jessamine High School in Nicholasville and undecided on a major and career path, was one of two $10,000 scholarship recipients, along with Caroline Maas, 17, a Lafayette High School senior who is interested in commercial songwriting and audio production in the College of Media and Entertainment.

Amelia Meunier, 17, a Floyd County High senior who wants to study film production and music marketing in college, may have had the decision pendulum swung toward MTSU when her name was drawn for a $10,000 scholarship by McPhee.

“I have been debating between MTSU and another school,” said Meunier, who has a 31 ACT, 1410 SAT and 4.7 weighted GPA. “This puts me in a much better financial position.” She is also a state doubles runner-up in tennis.

Jiovanni Woodley, 14, a freshman at Carter G. Woodson Academy in Lexington, attended with his parents, Carla and Dakota Eldridge, a U.S. Army captain and MTSU Military Science faculty member.

Things to remember

MTSU offers daily campus tours, its final True Blue Preview will be Saturday, Nov. 5, the deadline to apply for guaranteed scholarships for qualifying first-year students is Dec. 1 (Feb. 15, 2023, for qualifying transfers) and the start of the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) process began Oct. 1.

On deck

MTSU’s next tour stops will be in Tennessee — Tuesday, Nov. 8, at Esplande Memphis, 901 Cordova Station Ave. in Cordova, a Memphis suburb, and Wednesday, Nov. 9, in Jackson at the Jackson Country Club, 31 Country Club Lane.

At both venues, MTSU will host 6 p.m. student receptions and 12:30 p.m. thank-you luncheons for counselors and community college staff. All events are free.

Visit https://mtsu.edu/rsvp for information on all the remaining stops of the tour.

— Randy Weiler (Randy.Weiler@mtsu.edu)


COMMENTS ARE OFF THIS POST

WE ARE TRUE BLUE