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‘MTSU On the Record’ reveals public health profess...

‘MTSU On the Record’ reveals public health professionals’ duty transitions  

Dr. Kahler Stone, an assistant professor of health and human performance, is a guest on an upcoming "MTSU On the Record" program on WMOT-FM Roots Radio. Stone, an epidemiologist, is co-author of a study that shows many public health workers have been shifted from their regular duties to COVID-related functions because of the urgency of the pandemic. (Medical photos by Karolina Grabowska and Mart Production from Pexels)

Dr. Kahler Stone, an assistant professor of health and human performance, is shown above in a promotional graphic for his guest appearance on the Nov. 2, 2021, edition of the “MTSU On the Record” program on WMOT-FM Roots Radio. Stone, an epidemiologist, is co-author of a study that shows many public health workers have been shifted from their regular duties to COVID-related functions because of the pandemic. (Medical photos by Karolina Grabowska and Mart Production from Pexels)

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on public health professionals and the ways in which they serve the public were the topic of discussion on a recent “MTSU On the Record” radio program. 

Host Gina Logue’s interview with Dr. Kahler Stone, an assistant professor of health and human performance, first aired Nov. 2 on WMOT-FM Roots Radio 89.5 and at www.wmot.org.

You can listen to their conversation via the SoundCloud link above.

Dr. Kahler W. Stone, assistant professor, Department of Health and Human Performance

Dr. Kahler Stone

Gina K. Logue, MTSU News and Media Relations specialist

Gina K. Logue

Stone, an epidemiologist, is co-author of a study that shows many public health workers have been shifted from their regular duties to COVID-related functions because of the urgency of the pandemic.

A survey of nearly 300 respondents found substantial reductions in attention to chronic disease, maternal-child health, substance abuse, environmental health, sexually transmitted diseases and other issues, all because workers concerned with those problems were diverted to the fight against COVID-19.

“The public health workforce was estimated before the pandemic to be anywhere between 20 to 30% underfunded,” Stone said, “so they’re already running thin. They’re already trying to provide all these essential services (and) scraping by.”

The article, “The impact of the COVID-19 response on the provision of other public health services in the U.S.: A cross sectional study,” was published Oct. 14 by PLOS One, a journal of the Public Library of Science. It’s available to read by clicking the title.

To hear previous “MTSU On the Record” programs, visit the searchable “Audio Clips” archives at www.mtsunews.com.

For more information about the radio program, contact Logue at 615-898-5081 or WMOT-FM at 615-898-2800.


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